Doomsday-like explosion seen blasting from the sun | Science | News

Doomsday-like explosion seen blasting from the sun | Science | News

Large expulsions of plasma and magnetism from the Sun have been observed in satellite data. The explosion is known as coronal mass ejection (CME) and it occurs when the magnetism becomes unstable on the surface of a star in the center of our solar system. CME was spotted by NASA’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, with some claiming the expulsion to resemble the Doomsday Machine from Star Trek.

The Doomsday Machine was a mechanical beast in space, with a large circular opening and a long, faded tail.

Fortunately for Earth, CME has been ejected out of Earth’s direction.

The Astronomy website Space Weather said: “The launch of a coronal mass machine (CME) away from the sun during the early hours of October 24th.

“It will not hit the Earth. The source of the explosion was magnetic filaments near the northeastern end of the sun, which became unstable and exploded.”

If the storm had hit Earth, it was likely caused by auroras in the North or South Pole.

Aurora is created when a stream of magnetic particles strikes Earth’s magnetic shield, deflecting it.

When the particles are deflected, they create a stunning display of green and blue light in the upper or lower levels of the planet.

However, the consequences can be much more severe than in the northern or southern lights.

Solar particles can expand Earth’s atmosphere.

Read more: UFOs have been seen leaving the sun Proof of the Holo-Sun theory – claim

Yet another large solar storm could occur, prompting researchers to urge policymakers to invest in better infrastructure to monitor our host star.

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A recent study from the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Russia said: “A large solar storm can cut off electricity, television broadcasting, internet and wireless communications, leading to large cascading effects in many areas of life.

According to some experts, the damage from such an extreme event could cost up to several trillions of dollars and restore the infrastructure and economy could take up to 10 years.

“Thus, understanding and predicting the most dangerous extreme events is of utmost importance in protecting society and technology from the global hazards of space weather.”

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