Biden transmission updates: NPR

Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, pictured at the Capitol on Friday, admitted Monday that the Electoral College confirms that Joe Biden is the president-elect. Many Republicans have held out so far.

Stephanie Reynolds / Getty Images


Hide the caption

Toggle caption

Stephanie Reynolds / Getty Images

Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, pictured at the Capitol on Friday, admitted Monday that the Electoral College confirms that Joe Biden is the president-elect. Many Republicans have held out so far.

Stephanie Reynolds / Getty Images

With the Electoral College voting now complete, a new wave of Republicans in the Senate is acknowledging what was apparent weeks ago: Joe Biden is the president-elect.

In the days following the November 3 election, only a handful of Republican senators – most of them moderates – recognized Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris’ victory. Since then, many Republicans in the room have turned to President Trump’s legal appeals instead.

That started to change on Monday. In some cases, like that of Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley, they admit it somewhat reluctantly.

“It doesn’t matter what Chuck Grassley thinks,” Grassley said moments after the California election confirmed Biden’s victory. “The Constitution answered that question.” “That’s all I can say about him.”

Nevertheless, a new wave of members headed towards the plans for Biden’s next presidency.

Senator Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia told a Capitol Hill reporter, “It definitely looks this way, and I think it’s time to turn the page and start a new administration.”

READ  North Carolina Courage and Portland Thorns FC knelt during the national anthem

Others in that camp include the Senate Majority, Webb John Thon of South Dakota, Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri, John Cornyn of Texas, Tom Tillis of North Carolina, and Kevin Kramer of North Dakota.

“At some point you have to face the music. And I think once the Electoral College has settled the issue today, it is time for everyone to move forward,” Thon told reporters.

Tillis said Biden is the president-elect, pending the remaining legal cases.

“He’s a presumptive boss,” Tillis said. “But I do not want to rule out valid legal disputes that will be settled within the next two weeks.”

When asked, Kramer stopped using the phrase “president-elect” to describe Biden, but acknowledged that it appeared to be the case.

“I think if this is what you officially call someone after the Electoral College, then I’m fine with that,” Kramer said.

Senator Rob Portman of Ohio was among those who issued clear statements confirming the victory.

“Although I supported President Trump, the Electoral College vote today demonstrates that Joe Biden is now the president-elect,” he said.

Retired Tennessee Senator Lamar Alexander took the recognition a step forward, urging Trump to end his allegations.

“The presidential election has ended. Countries ratified the votes. Courts resolved disputes. Voters voted. I hope President Trump will put the country first, take pride in his tremendous accomplishments, and help President-elect Biden get off,” Alexander said, “A good start.” Especially during this pandemic, An orderly transfer of power is crucial. “

READ  The director of Wirecard has resigned because two billion dollars are disappearing, they claim the fraud claims

However, many of their colleagues remain dismissive. Some declined to comment, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, who did not respond to frequent questions from reporters on Monday.

“I’ll call Joe until he is sworn in,” said Lindsay Graham, the South Carolina senator when asked, before he notices some legal challenges.

Senators Jim Inhove of Oklahoma and John Barrasso of Wyoming were among those not prepared on Monday to recognize the president-elect.

“Not yet,” said Inhove.

Trump and the Republican failed efforts to cancel the elections – which indicate unfounded allegations of widespread voter fraud – It is part of one of the reasons for retiring from Michigan Representative Paul Mitchell For CNN On Monday he was leaving his party to become independent.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *