British imperialist monuments face bitter suspicion amid the Black Lives Matter protests

On Sunday, Black living matter protesters in BristolFrom the UK, he tore down a statue of 17th-century slave trader Edward Colston and dragged it through the streets before, unreservedly, throwing it into the Avon River.

Some applauded the move, while others rejected what they called the “mining rule.”

WITH colonial history spanning centuries – and the mania for erecting statues in the 19th century – British cities and towns are interspersed with monuments to figures like Colston.

For some, the statues have melted into the background of everyday life, but many are now wondering if they should still stand on their pedestals.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced on Tuesday a commission to examine the future of landmarks in the UK capital, including murals, street art, street names and statues.

The aim of the Public Empire Diversity Commission is to improve “the diversity in the public kingdom of London to ensure that the capital’s landmarks adequately reflect London’s achievements and diversity.”

Actions against statues related to the slave trade and imperialism have also taken place in other parts of Europe, with protesters in Belgium defending several monuments to King Leopold II in recent days.
There are a number of Confederate statues in the United States are removed authorities in the midst of widespread protests over the death of George Floyd.

Although these actions divided public opinion, they contained a growing conversation about what should happen to statues of individuals like Colston, who benefited from the suffering of many.

Winston Churchill

The statue of Winston Churchill in London’s Parliament Square is seen as sparse with the words “he was a racist” written after his name, following the Black Lives Matter demonstrations on June 7, 2020. Credit: Isabel Infantes / AFP / Getty Images

British War Prime Minister Winston Churchill is seen as an example of inspiring leadership, presiding over the country’s defeat by Nazism. In 2002, he was at the top BBC national survey to find the 100 greatest Britons, and his portrait is currently in a £ 5 banknote in the UK.
However, it is known that he also took positions related to the social hierarchy that would be considered racist today and his policies are wrong for causing a famine in Bengal in 1943, which is estimated to have taken more than three million lives. In March 2019, the study used soil analysis for the first time to determine that the famine was caused by Churchill’s policies rather than a severe drought.

During Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest, a statue of Churchill standing in London’s Parliament Square was littered with the words “… is a racist”.

READ  Twins vs. Astros: Live Game 1 broadcast, TV channel, start time, odds for the AL Wild Card series

Cecil Rhodes

Oriel College has so far retained this statue of Cecil Rhodes, despite an ongoing campaign to remove it.

Oriel College has so far retained this statue of Cecil Rhodes, despite an ongoing campaign to remove it. Credit: Carl Court / Getty Images

Cecil Rhodes, who helped build the British Empire in southern Africa, was immortalized in a statue in front of Oriel College, part of Oxford University.

In 2016, the faculty refused to remove the work despite concerted pressure from Rhodes must fall at Oxford campaign group, which continues efforts to bring it down.
“There is no place for statues that honor heinous anti-black racists in South Africa, the United States, Bristol or Oxford,” the group said. Tweeted on Sunday, inviting people to attend a college protest Tuesday.

Neither Oxford University nor Oriel College responded to CNN’s request for comment.

In 2015, a statue of Rhodes was removed from the campus of the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

“He represents the former colonial representative of this country – supremacy, racism, misogyny,” said Ramabina Mahapa, then president of the student group that led the campaign to remove the statue.

David Hume

The poster was placed in protest at a statue of Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume, expanding his racist views.

The poster was placed in protest at a statue of Scottish Enlightenment philosopher David Hume, expanding his racist views. Credit: jpi media

In Edinburgh, a statue of 18th-century Scottish philosopher David Hume is adorned with a poster outlining his views on white superiority.

Hume is considered one of the most prominent thinkers of the Scottish Enlightenment, and his bronze statue sits on Edinburgh’s Royal Mile, the city’s main Old Town thoroughfare.

But Hume’s reputation has waned in recent years, with an increased focus on his views on race. The sign left on the statue contains a line from Hume’s essay “National Characters” which says that he is “prone to suspicion of blacks … that he is naturally inferior to whites.”

Nelson's column at the top of the statue of Admiral Horati Nelson rises above Trafalgar Square in central London.

Nelson’s column at the top of the statue of Admiral Horati Nelson rises above Trafalgar Square in central London. Credit: evenfh / Shutterstock

READ  Los Angeles Police "ambush": Duet Lee Murray is accused of attempted murder

Henry Dundas

A statue of Scottish politician Henry Dundas stands above a monument to Melville in the city of Edinburgh.

Dundas, who has held a number of government duties, including foreign minister, is known for supporting the postponement of the abolition of slavery in the late 18th century.

The monument was graffiti during Sunday protests, and St. An online petition now calls for the removal of the Dundas statue, and for streets named in his honor to be renamed.

Campaigners instead recommend that the streets be named after Scottish-Jamaican slave Joseph Knight, who successfully freed himself in the courts by proving that Scottish law does not recognize slavery.

Different approaches

Calls are also made to remove the statues dedicated Admiral Horatio Nelson – who triumphed gloriously over Napoleon and is now commemorated on a column in London’s Trafalgar Square – for his opposition to the abolition of slavery.
Similar appeals were made to the show William Gladstone, a former prime minister who helped his father the slave owner seek compensation from the British government after the trade was banned.
William Gladstone served as British Prime Minister four times in the 19th century. His father was a slave owner.

William Gladstone served as British Prime Minister four times in the 19th century. His father was a slave owner. Credit: See pictures / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

The demolition of the statue is a time form of protest, from the demolition of the statue of Lenin when the USSR collapsed in 1989, to the fall of the monument to Saddam Hussein in Baghdad in 2003.

These cases of destruction have been widely applauded in the Western world, but recent campaigns to remove statues of controversial figures in places like the US and the UK have divided public opinion.

READ  Finland: VDL manufactures 31 e-buses for Lahti and Kuopio

An alternative approach has been taken in Paraguay, where artist Carlos Colombino has been asked to re-imagine a statue of former dictator General Alfred Stroessner who ruled the country from 1954 to 1989. Instead of simply destroying the monument, Colombino incorporated some of its most recognizable parts between two huge blocks cement as a memorial to the victims of the dictatorship.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *