The mourners pay tribute to Rayshard Brooks during a public tour

Rev. Raphael G. Warnock comforts Tomika Miller, the wife of Rayshard Brooks, during Brooks' public viewing at Ebenezer Baptist Church on Monday, June 22 in Atlanta.

Democratic senators on Monday gave their strongest indications, but can still prevent the GOP’s police reform bill from coming to the floor, a risky move that could prevent any reorganization measures this year due to their party’s concerns that the bill is about GOP too weak.

Democrats are demanding clear commitments from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to be able to vote on the amendments on the floor. But McConnell has said so far that he would like to have an “open” procedure on the floor, but did not specify which amendments would be considered. Democrats are expected to continue discussing their strategy on Tuesday.

After calling for a call on Monday afternoon, Senate Democrats were defeated over prospects for progress on a bill proposed by GOP Senator Tim Scott, saying much more needed to be changed and arguing that McConnell had not pledged to allow votes. on amendments to cat. Many expected the bill to be blocked because Republicans needed at least seven Democratic votes to end the farewell.

Senator Mazie Hirono, a Hawaiian Democrat, said Scott’s bill “is not doing what we should be doing, and that is honest police reform.”

“It’s time to talk before the bill falls to the floor … if you really want to work seriously on a serious matter, you should probably talk right away,” she said.

Senate for Minorities Dick Durbin declined to discuss his party’s strategy, but pointed to a decision by Democrats to block McConnell’s initial $ 2 trillion incentive plan in March. After that, the two sides broke the deal that Democrats lagged behind after changes to the historic bailout package.

READ  Siberia has recorded its warmest June, says Copernicus' atmospheric surveillance service

“We have faced similar offers in the past – on the CARES law – and I think the best thing that has happened is that we did not accept his offer and asked for a two-party approach to it,” Durbin said.

In addition, key groups have also begun to invoke their opposition to the plan, including the influential NAACP, which called on senators to block the bill in a procedural vote Wednesday.

Also on Monday, Rev. Al Sharpton and Benjamin Crump – a lawyer representing the family of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who was killed while in custody in Minneapolis when an officer knelt on his neck – have announced their opposition to Scott’s plan.

“The black community is tired of word of mouth and is shocked that this $ 7 billion package can be considered legislation,” Crump said.

Many Democrats would not say whether they would vote against continuing the bill, even though they weren’t sure how the “yes” vote would come on Wednesday.

  • New Jersey, Senator Cory Booker, the lead author of the Democrats bill, would not say on Monday whether to vote to improve the Scott law. “We had a lot of conversations,” Booker said. “I think there are a lot of things at the moment that show that the process we’re going through isn’t just a good process … The house went through a process. They went through the board, they did a lot of things. It was a normal, regular ordering process. That’s not it.” “We have a lot of talk about it now and we’ll see where it ends.”
  • Senator Chris Murphy from Connecticut added, “There was no reach from McConnel.”
  • Senator Bob Menendez, a Democrat from New Jersey, was sharply critical of Scott’s law, called the Justice Act. “Where is the justice in the Justice Act?” He said. Asked if Democrats could change him at will, Menendez said, “If you have commitments in advance. There are none.”
READ  Elsa Raven, actress of the 'Back to the Future' character, has passed away at the age of 91

One Democrat in a tough re-election, Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama, said he was inclined to vote to continue the bill. But when asked about the lack of progress in talks with McConnell, Jones said, “He never did. We’ll see where he goes.”

Senator Joe Manchin, a Democrat from West Virginia and fast-paced, said: “I have no idea (how I’m going to vote.) Everything is still open.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *